From Salt Lake City to South Korea

scu-stories / SCU Staff / 02.08.18

SCU Alum at the Winter Games

Dr. Jason Reynolds

For lifelong athlete Jason Reynolds, DC, DACBSP ’08 (LACC) having a role in the Olympics is a dream come true.

“I love Olympic sport. I love the amateurism that’s involved,” he says.

Reynolds is a Senior High Performance Health Care Services Provider at the Utah Olympic Oval in Salt Lake City, Utah. He spends significant time treating Team USA athletes, and specifically US speed skaters who live and train in Salt Lake City. That means he will serve as more than just a physician in PyeongChang this winter – he will be a fan and cheerleader.

“Having worked with athletes in a fulltime capacity, you see the sacrifices they make, the hard work they put in and everything they go through,” Reynolds says. “It will be fun to share in their successes as these athletes compete on the biggest stage in their sporting careers.”

As a longtime track and field athlete, Reynolds had an early link to the world of sports medicine. He knew he wanted to become a healthcare provider, but was unsure which direction to take. He considered traditional medical school or maybe becoming a physical therapist.

But after speaking with a mentor – who happened to be a chiropractor and SCU alum – something clicked for Reynolds.

“I grew up around both chiropractic and sports medicine. To me, those were always kind of two different things,” he says. “My mentor showed that you could be a chiropractor and a sports medicine provider.”

SCU’s Doctor of Chiropractic residency program gave Reynolds a direct conduit to the USOC. During his residency, he had the opportunity to join USA Field Hockey in France for a competition and formed a strong rapport with the coaches and medical staff. After graduating from SCU, the team hired him as a part-time medical director.

In his current role as a USOC health care provider, Reynolds can see how choosing chiropractic medicine and SCU was a pivotal decision in his career.

“When you’re treating an elite athlete, you have to look at all different aspects of his or her training regimen. Not just what they’re lifting in the weight room, but also what they’re eating and pain management and their mental health – the ‘whole person,’ so to speak,” Reynolds explains. “I’m not saying that I work in all of those realms, but I am on a team of health providers. I think being a chiropractor, I have a sense of all of those different disciplines.”

In PyeongChang, Reynolds will care for athletes in the health clinic from 7 a.m. “until the last patient is treated.”


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