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Curriculum Summary

Curriculum Summary


Fall Term I


ANM 6011 Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology & Imaging

The Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology & Imaging course consists of a detailed study of the normal structure, development, and organization of the human body. This course undertakes a regional approach rather than a systemic approach to Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology & Imaging. It is distributed into three block contents. Gross structures are studied in the laboratory using the Complete Anatomy vitual application. The radiology component of Gross Anatomy serves as the introduction to radiology and prepares the student for further development. Lectures stress the contribution of developmental events to gross anatomical organization and the correlation of this organization with clinically relevant conditions.


PHM 6921 Physiology I

Medical Physiology series consists of two courses. The course consists of recorded lectures, in-class sessions using audience response systems, self-directed learning and small group discussions. Physiology is the comprehensive study of the function of the human body on an organ system basis. Emphasis is on the integration of functions from the cellular level to that of the total organism and the application of physiology concepts to problem solving. The following units will be covered in the Physiology I course: Membrane and Action Potentials, Cellular and Systemic Physiology of the Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems.


BCM 6121 Medical Biochemistry I

The Medical Biochemistry course is two courses presented MS in Medical Sciences students over the span of two semesters. In these courses, medical aspects are emphasized to build up the necessary background for future application in other basic sciences and clinical courses. Medical Biochemistry I includes the following units: Structural and functional relationships of proteins, biological membranes, energy generation, genetics and hormone reception. In this course, medical aspects are emphasized to build up the necessary background for future application in other basic sciences and clinical courses. This course is delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model, together with small group discussions of clinical cases. One of the main intentions of the small group discussions is for the students to apply the biochemical concepts learned in lectures to understand the molecular basis of a given disease.


Spring Term II


MIM 6420 Microbiology I

The course covers the most common pathogens involved in infectious diseases and their characteristics. It includes basic concepts of immunology, virology, mycology, bacteriology and parasitology and clinical correlations will be discussed in small groups.


PHM 6922 Physiology II

The second course of the series consists of recorded lectures, in-class sessions using audience response systems, self-directed learning and small group discussions. Physiology is the comprehensive study of the function of the human body on an organ system basis. Emphasis is on the integration of functions from the cellular level to that of the total organism and the application of physiology concepts to problem solving. The following units will be covered in the Physiology II course: Gastrointestinal, Renal and Endocrine Physiology Systems.


BCM 6122 Medical Biochemistry II

This course is a continuation of Medical Biochemistry I. In these courses, medical aspects are emphasized to build up the necessary background for future application in other basic sciences and clinical courses. Medical Biochemistry II includes the following units: Structural and functional relationships of carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, gene expression and control, and medical genetics. In this course, medical aspects are emphasized to build up the necessary background for future application in other basic sciences and clinical courses. This course is delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model, together with small group discussions of clinical cases. One of the main intentions of the small group discussions is for the students to apply the biochemical concepts learned in lectures to understand the molecular basis of a given disease.


PHM 6020 Neuroscience

This course provides a knowledge-base of the human central nervous system that they will use when learning how to diagnose and treat neurological disorders. The course provides students the essential principles of neurological function, from the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neural communication to the organization and function of sensory and motor systems, and higher cognitive function. Clinical correlations will reinforce the knowledge of brain structure and strengthen skills to understand the human nervous system in small groups.


Summer Term III


ANM 6051 Histology and Cell Biology

This course covers the internal structure of cells, tissues and organs in the human body presenting a comprehensive survey of many of their complex interrelationships. Clinical correlations will be discussed in small groups.


MEM 6350 Medical Ethics

This course will attempt to provide didactic experiences for MS students in specific areas within the field of medical ethics. The need for these experiences stems from the recognition that ethical dilemmas are inherent in medical care. Although dramatic issues such as cloning, abortion and organ donation have strong ethical implications, it is important to realize that the practicing doctor will face ethical decisions every day while solving more commonplace problems. Most everyday ethical questions have well- accepted answers; only the most difficult ethical questions seem to defy resolution. Even so, it is important for physicians to develop an understanding of the principles of medical ethics and a system of ethical reasoning that will result in consistent decisions. The Medical Ethics course include lectures, individual readings and small-group discussion sessions about a variety of subjects related to this field. The didactic activities include discussion of clinical cases which have been selected to represent ethical dilemmas similar to those that are likely encountered in real life.


IHD 919 Interprofessional Perspective in Health Disparities

This course is designed to provide a general overview of gaps in health outcomes associated with health disparities. A special emphasis will be given to the social determinants of health such as race/ethnicity, social class, socioeconomic status, sex, sexuality, nationality and migration status. The course will focus on the impact of health disparities’ impact at multiple system’s levels (e.g. individual, patient-clinician, healthcare system, etc.).

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